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Adamthwaite Archive

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distribution data on migration

Migration across the UK

 

From the early clustering of Adamthwaites in Ravenstonedale in Westmorland and in the West Riding of Yorkshire (see the 'History' pages), we can see a gradual spread of families to other parts of England. We have found  only occasional records of temporary residence in Scotland, Wales and Ireland. The following figures relate only to births or baptisms:

 

  • Before 1600: A search of the IGI reveals no Adamthwat (or variant) entries before the year of 1550. Between 1550 and 1600 there are a total of 22 baptisms recorded on IGI – 20 of these in Ravenstonedale, Westmorland, 2 in St Crux, York.  (Note: duplicates and non-extracted entries have been discounted)

 

  • Between 1601 and 1700 (total 86 baptisms): We have collected records from a variety of sources and have identified a total of 86 Adamthwaite baptisms in this period – of these 64 were in Westmorland (all but one in Ravenstonedale); 14 were in the West riding of Yorkshire (mainly Sedbegh), and 8 were in the City of London.

 

  • Between 1701 and 1800 (total 83 baptisms):  in this period there were 61 baptisms recorded in Westmorland, 20 in the West Riding of Yorkshire and 2 in the City of London.

 

  • Between 1801 and 1900 (total 366 baptisms/births): As well as a huge increase in the recorded number of births/baptisms, much more movement is detected at this time as the many Adamthwaite farmers and agricultural labourers sought work in mining and other industries in County Durham and Lancashire, and for the first time the number of Adamthwaites in London and Middlesex outnumbered those in Westmorland.  The last Adamthwaite birth recorded in Ravenstonedale was in 1833, though there were still many families in surrounding towns and villages. Also during this century a number of Adamthwaites emigrated to Australia, Canada and America.  In the UK the following numbers of baptisms/births were recorded during the 19th century:  

 

  • Between 1901 and 2000  (total 314 births): Although the distribution across the country has continued, the main areas inhabited by Adamthwaite families remain in London and surrounding counties, and in the north of England in the counties of Westmorland, Yorkshire, Durham and Lancashire.

 

  • Current population: According to the ONS database, there were 132 individuals with the surname Adamthwaite living in England, Wales and the Isle of Man in 2002.  This compares with 78 individuals found in the 1841 census, 87 in the 1851 census, 122 in the 1861 census, 128 in the 1871 census, 158 in the 1881 census, 154 in the 1891 census and 141 in the 1901 census.

 

I produced the map below to illustrate the known migrations away from Ravenstonedale (which is the location of all records prior to 1589).  Click on the map to view a much larger copy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The spread of individual families across the country from the original settlements in Westmorland and the West Riding of Yorkshire can be followed most clearly on the following distribution maps which were created with Archer Software GenMapUK, using the numbers of individuals located in the censuses between 1841 and 1901:

migration data table 1 map for migration grey with labels

Earliest sightings of Adamthwaites in ...

Ravenstonedale (bef 1540)

York St Crux (one record 1589)

Bolton on Swale (1600-1700)

Sedburgh (major settlement from 1606)

Essex (one will 1625)

London (from before 1638)

Kendal (1710)

Kirkby Stephen (from 1771)

Brough (from 1771)

Appleby (from 1802)

Manchester (from 1808)

Co Durham (from 1870s

 

the map used is based on Pinkerton's map of 1811 (source David Rumsey's map collection)